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Conventions For Metrics For Event-Related Tweets

Posted by Brian Kelly on 15 November 2010

According to Summarizr there have been 6,927 tweets for the #altc2010 event hashtag, which compares with 4,735 tweets for the #altc2009 event. We can therefore conclude that there has been an increase of almost 50% in Twitter usage. Or can we? If we had carried out the analysis immediately after the event the numbers would probably have been different. And use of either of these hashtags now, when talking about a past event, will have a different context to using the hashtag during the event, when such tags provided some level of engagement with the Twitter community centred around the event’s Twitter stream.

In order to make meaningful comparisons there is a need to be able to filter the tweets in a consistent fashion. Fortunately the Twapper Keeper service allows tweets to be filtered by various parameters, including a date range. And since the Summarizr service uses Twapper Keeper to provide its statistics it is possible to use Summarizr’s metrics in a consistent fashion.

But what date range should be used? An initial suggestion might be for the day(s) of the event. But this would fail to include discussions which take place immediately before and after an event. In addition this could also mean that tweets from an international audience not being included, such as tweets from an Australian audience which take place the following day. Such confusions over dates might apply particularly to events held in other countries since the times used in Twitter are based on GMT.

In order to avoid such confusions when I cite statistics from Summarizr I now include tweets posted during the week of an event, typically starting on the Sunday and finishing on the following Saturday. For an event lasting for a day I start on the day before the event and finish on the following day.

The syntax for obtaining statistics from Twapper Keeper over a date range is:

http://summarizr.labs.eduserv.org.uk/?hashtag=hashtag&sm=mm&sd=dd&sy=yyyy&em=mm&ed=dd&ey=yyyy

where:

sm is the start month (from 1 to 12)
sd is the start day (from 1 to 31)
sy is the start year (e.g. 2010)

em is the end month (from 1 to 12)
ed is the end day (from 1 to 31)
ey is the end year (e.g. 2010)

For example the following URL will give statistics for the #altc2009 hashtag between 6-11 September 2009:

http://summarizr.labs.eduserv.org.uk/?hashtag=altc2009&sm=9&sd=6&sy=2009&em=9&ed=11&ey=2009

and the following statistics for the #altc2010 hashtag between 5-12 September 2010:

http://summarizr.labs.eduserv.org.uk/?hashtag=altc2010&sm=9&sd=5&sy=2010&em=9&ed=12&ey=2010

This provides the following statistics:

ALT-C 2009 ALT-C 2010
Nos. of tweets 4,010 6,238
Nos. of twitterers    650    666
Nos. of hashtags tweeted    125    277
Nos. of URLs tweeted    554    683
Nos. of geo-located tweets        0      35

This indicates that there has been of 56% in twitter usage between comparable periods in 2009 and 2010.

Note that the statistics for the numbers of geo-located tweets demonstrate that in 2009 nobody was providing geo-located tweets for the event hashtag. This data could easily be lost if Twitter users today started to refer to the 2009 event and had started to make use of geo-location.

To sum up my proposal:

  • The start date for a one-day event is the previous day and the end date is the following day. This will address internationalisation issues due to engagement for those in other time zones and cover discussions just before and just after the event.
  • The start date for an event lasting longer than a single day is the previous Sunday and the end date is the following Saturday. This will address internationalisation issues due to engagement for those in other time zones and cover discussions just before and just after the event.

Is this a convention we can agree on, to ensure that meaningful comparisons can be made?


Twitter conversation from Topsy: [View]

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5 Responses to “Conventions For Metrics For Event-Related Tweets”

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Brian Kelly, mariekeguy, Lukas Koster, Peter J Barnes, Brian Kelly and others. Brian Kelly said: Conventions For Metrics For Event-Related Tweets: According to Summarizr here have been 6,927 tweets for the #al… http://bit.ly/9wX5l5 [...]

  2. Re: Is this a convention we can agree on, to ensure that meaningful comparisons can be made?

    It depends what you want to measure!?

    For me, event amplification can start well before an event and carry on well after – weeks or months in some cases. So, if you want to measure “event-related tweets” in their widest form then your proposal doesn’t make sense.

    If you are just interested in what happens during an event, then what you propose probably makes some sense, though I don’t really understand why “the day before … until the day after” doesn’t work for all kinds of events?

  3. [...] But note that if you want the statistics for a specified period you should read the post of Conventions For Metrics For Event-Related Tweets – and here’s an analysis of the tweets on 17-18  June [...]

  4. [...] it is possible to restrict a Summarizr analysis to a particular date range. In a blog post on Conventions For Metrics For Event-Related Tweets I pointed out that in order to make valid comparisons between the use of Twitter at events there [...]

  5. [...] from the Summarzr statistics of the 2,683 tweets from 310 users? (Note as described in a post on Conventions For Metrics For Event-Related Tweets I feel that such summaries should include a data range, so this total covers the period from [...]

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