UK Web Focus (Brian Kelly)

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Enhancing Access to Researchers’ Papers: How Librarians and Use of Social Media Can Help

Posted by Brian Kelly on 26 Mar 2012

Tomorrow I’m giving a talk on “Enhancing Access to Researchers’ Papers: How Librarians and Use of Social Media Can Help” at a meeting of subject librarians at the University of Bath.

The talk is based on work which I’ve recently described on this blog including the post on How Researchers Can Use Inbound Linking Strategies to Enhance Access to Their Papers.

The talk will also address ideas described in a follow-up post on Profiling Staff and Researcher Use of Cloud Services Across Russell Group Universities in which I suggested that, in addition, to encouraging researchers to make their researcher publications available on their institutional repository, they should also be providing metadata and links to the papers from popular third party services, such as LinkedIn, Academia.edu, Microsoft Academic Search and Google Scholar Citations, which are provided particularly for use by researchers and academic staff.

The talk will highlight work in progress in making use of SEO analysis talks, including Linkdiagnosis.com and Majesticseo.com, in order to investigate what the highest SEO-ranking sites which link to the University’ of Bath’s Opus repository are. The initial findings from Linkdiagnosis.com suggests that wikipedia.org, wordpress.com, academic.research.microsoft.com and msn.com are the web sites with the highest SEO rankings which have links to the Opus repository. These four web sites all have an SEO Domain Authority score of 100, where this score “is a 100 point predicative score of the domain’s ranking potential in the search engines“.

The talk then goes on to suggest, as explaining in a post on My Trusted Social Librarian, that in addition to encouraging researchers to use such service, librarians may also help to support researchers by being a social librarians and favouriting (or liking or +1ng) useful resources since such actions can be seen in services such as Google,

The slides are available on Slideshare and embedded below.

I would welcome feedback.

3 Responses to “Enhancing Access to Researchers’ Papers: How Librarians and Use of Social Media Can Help”

  1. fnorman said

    Will you mention Gunther Eysenbach’s work on Tweetations? I am a bit sceptical, but it is interesting imho.

    http://www.jmir.org/2011/4/e123/

  2. fnorman said

    Martin Fenner mentions the topic of “marketing for scientists”, including a round-up of tools and strategies.

    http://blogs.plos.org/mfenner/2012/03/27/marketing-for-scientists/

  3. […] In a previous post I suggested that since LinkedIn.com is so widely used across Russell Group Universities, encouraging researchers to provide links to their papers hosted in their institutional repository would enhance the visibility of papers to Google, especially since LinkedIn has such a high Alexa ranking (it currently is listed at number 13 in the global ranking order). […]

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